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Lower Health Insurance Utilization
Fewer Hospital Admissions in All Disease Categories


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A five-year study of health insurance statistics on more than 2,000 people practicing the Transcendental Meditation technique found that they had less than half the doctor visits and hospitalization compared to other groups of comparable age, gender, profession, and insurance terms. The difference between the two groups was greatest in individuals over 40 years of age, indicating that the benefits of practicing the technique are potentially greatest for those facing the greatest risk of disease.

In addition, the study showed that for those practicing the TM technique there were fewer hospital admissions in all disease categories -- including 87% less hospitalization for cardiovascular disease, 55% less for cancer, 87% less for diseases of the nervous system, and 73% less for nose, throat and lung problems. The results also showed 76% reduction in major surgery.

These statistics, which document improved health in all age groups and in all categories of disease, indicate that the practice of the TM technique restores balance on a very fundamental level of the physiology. The distinctive state of restful alertness that is gained during the practice allows the immune system and self-repair processes to establish normal, healthy functioning throughout the body, resulting in better general health and the prevention of disease.

This study suggests that the application of the Transcendental Meditation program in the area of health will create substantial savings of financial, medical and human resources. Other research has found substantial reductions in health care costs among those practicing the TM technique.

References:
1. Psychosomatic Medicine 49 (1987): 493-507.
2. American Journal of Health Promotion 10 (1996): 208-216.

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